Women's Ministries


       




But let your adorning be the hidden person of the heart with the imperishable beauty of a gentle and quiet spirit, which in God’s sight is very precious. 1 Peter 3:4


 



Proverbs 31:10-12 and 25-31

A wife of noble character who can find?
She is worth far more than rubies.

Her husband has full confidence in her
and lacks nothing of value.

She brings him good,not harm,

all the days of her life.

She is clothed with strength and dignity;
she can laugh at the days to come.

She speaks with wisdom,
and faithful instruction is on her tongue.

She watches over the affairs of her household
and does not eat the bread of idleness.

Her children arise and call her blessed;
her husband also, and he praises her:

"Many women do noble things,
but you surpass them all."

Charm is deceptive, and beauty is fleeting;
but a woman who fears the LORD is to be praised.

Give her the reward she has earned,
and let her works bring her praise at the city gate.


Faith Baptist Community Center Meals

January 10, 2018
Sign up to bring a casserole or dessert!
Women's Missionary 
Fellowship
Loading Up for Faith!
Ladies' Scrapbooking
 & Craft Night
Every 1st Friday
 of the month.
7pm @ Church
Work on your project 
and enjoy a 
ladies' night out!
Upcoming dates:
 
 Dec. 1

True Rest

Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest. 
Matthew 11:28

Most of the time, invitations are exclusive. They rule some people in and other people out. 

In light of life’s exclusive invitations, Jesus’ inclusive words fall on our ears like music, like dew in the desert. Savor them—especially the word all. Let the invitation roll over and over in your heart. “Come to me,” our Savior says. He speaks to “all who are weary and burdened.” Does that include you? The word weary in this verse goes far beyond needing one good night’s sleep. Burdened means much more than those one or two niggling worries that occasionally pop into our heads. 

When we find ourselves in the long, dark tunnel of true weariness and heavy burdens, Jesus meets us there. Just think of that! Jesus meets us in life’s dark places, in those dark times. When we feel lost, his presence and his promise transform the darkness, making even our weariness and our burdens a blessing. After all, these things have opened our ears and our hearts to his invitation. They drive us into our Savior’s embrace.

Prayer: Lord Jesus, your love excludes no one. Your grace invites even me to come, to find rest. Right now, I’m carrying many burdens and, trusting your promise, I want to lay them down . . .


True Rest

Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest. 
Matthew 11:28

Most of the time, invitations are exclusive. They rule some people in and other people out. 

In light of life’s exclusive invitations, Jesus’ inclusive words fall on our ears like music, like dew in the desert. Savor them—especially the word all. Let the invitation roll over and over in your heart. “Come to me,” our Savior says. He speaks to “all who are weary and burdened.” Does that include you? The word weary in this verse goes far beyond needing one good night’s sleep. Burdened means much more than those one or two niggling worries that occasionally pop into our heads. 

When we find ourselves in the long, dark tunnel of true weariness and heavy burdens, Jesus meets us there. Just think of that! Jesus meets us in life’s dark places, in those dark times. When we feel lost, his presence and his promise transform the darkness, making even our weariness and our burdens a blessing. After all, these things have opened our ears and our hearts to his invitation. They drive us into our Savior’s embrace.

Prayer: Lord Jesus, your love excludes no one. Your grace invites even me to come, to find rest. Right now, I’m carrying many burdens and, trusting your promise, I want to lay them down . . .


True Rest

Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest. 
Matthew 11:28

Most of the time, invitations are exclusive. They rule some people in and other people out. 

In light of life’s exclusive invitations, Jesus’ inclusive words fall on our ears like music, like dew in the desert. Savor them—especially the word all. Let the invitation roll over and over in your heart. “Come to me,” our Savior says. He speaks to “all who are weary and burdened.” Does that include you? The word weary in this verse goes far beyond needing one good night’s sleep. Burdened means much more than those one or two niggling worries that occasionally pop into our heads. 

When we find ourselves in the long, dark tunnel of true weariness and heavy burdens, Jesus meets us there. Just think of that! Jesus meets us in life’s dark places, in those dark times. When we feel lost, his presence and his promise transform the darkness, making even our weariness and our burdens a blessing. After all, these things have opened our ears and our hearts to his invitation. They drive us into our Savior’s embrace.

Prayer: Lord Jesus, your love excludes no one. Your grace invites even me to come, to find rest. Right now, I’m carrying many burdens and, trusting your promise, I want to lay them down . . .




 

  • .

 

Yes! And Amen!

 

No matter how many promises God has made, they are “Yes” in Christ. And so through him the “Amen” is spoken by us to the glory of God.

2 Corinthians 1:20


 

God’s promises to us are yes in Jesus, yes because of what our Savior has done. In Christ, God forgives. In Christ, God is with us forever. In Christ, every challenge we face becomes a blessing. In Christ, all our needs are fully met. In Christ, all the many promises God has made are fulfilled.

 

That’s one reason we pray “in Jesus’ name.” The formula isn’t some magical incantation. Instead, it reminds us that in and of ourselves, we have no claim on God or his blessings. As sinners, forgiven in our Savior, we come to God, asking him to fulfill his promises because of what Jesus has done for us.

 

Enfolded in Christ’s love for us, we can say a glad “Amen” to every one of God’s promises. Most importantly, we can say “Amen” to that specific promise we need to claim right now. The Hebrew word amen means, “Yes, so be it” or “Yes, it shall be so.”

 

This word, placed at the end of our prayers, expresses trust that our promise-making God will do what he has said. And then, as Scripture points out, God is glorified.

 

Prayer: My Father, when you gave Jesus into death for me, you demonstrated your intention to fulfill all the promises you have made. Still, trust often comes hard . . .

.

 



 

 



Forgiven and Forgiving

If you forgive men when they sin against you, your heavenly Father will also forgive you.

Matthew 6:14

Forgiveness just doesn’t come naturally. We’d rather keep score, tracking the offenses of others against us. Nursing a grudge can feel rather pleasant, at least for a while. Eventually, though, grudges have a way of growing until, monster like, the bitterness we’ve created devours us.

Our Savior teaches us a better way in today’s Bible verse. Almost always when Scripture urges us to forgive, it reminds us in the same breath that our Lord has forgiven us. By forgiving others, we demonstrate that we have understood our need for God’s forgiveness—and treasure it. God’s forgiveness toward us nurtures and encourages within us the decision to forgive those around us. 

As we grow in grace, we come to recognize more and more fully the value of the pardon we have received from Jesus. Then, more and more willingly we pray, “Lord, work your heart of kindness in me and teach me to forgive.” 

Prayer: Lord Jesus, your cross laid to rest all the grievances you had against me. Thank you! In light of your pardon, teach me . . . 
Forgiven and Forgiving

If you forgive men when they sin against you, your heavenly Father will also forgive you.

Matthew 6:14

Forgiveness just doesn’t come naturally. We’d rather keep score, tracking the offenses of others against us. Nursing a grudge can feel rather pleasant, at least for a while. Eventually, though, grudges have a way of growing until, monster like, the bitterness we’ve created devours us.

Our Savior teaches us a better way in today’s Bible verse. Almost always when Scripture urges us to forgive, it reminds us in the same breath that our Lord has forgiven us. By forgiving others, we demonstrate that we have understood our need for God’s forgiveness—and treasure it. God’s forgiveness toward us nurtures and encourages within us the decision to forgive those around us. 

As we grow in grace, we come to recognize more and more fully the value of the pardon we have received from Jesus. Then, more and more willingly we pray, “Lord, work your heart of kindness in me and teach me to forgive.” 

Prayer: Lord Jesus, your cross laid to rest all the grievances you had against me. Thank you! In light of your pardon, teach me . . . 
Forgiven and Forgiving

If you forgive men when they sin against you, your heavenly Father will also forgive you.

Matthew 6:14

Forgiveness just doesn’t come naturally. We’d rather keep score, tracking the offenses of others against us. Nursing a grudge can feel rather pleasant, at least for a while. Eventually, though, grudges have a way of growing until, monster like, the bitterness we’ve created devours us.

Our Savior teaches us a better way in today’s Bible verse. Almost always when Scripture urges us to forgive, it reminds us in the same breath that our Lord has forgiven us. By forgiving others, we demonstrate that we have understood our need for God’s forgiveness—and treasure it. God’s forgiveness toward us nurtures and encourages within us the decision to forgive those around us. 

As we grow in grace, we come to recognize more and more fully the value of the pardon we have received from Jesus. Then, more and more willingly we pray, “Lord, work your heart of kindness in me and teach me to forgive.” 

Prayer: Lord Jesus, your cross laid to rest all the grievances you had against me. Thank you! In light of your pardon, teach me . . . 

Forgiven and Forgiving

If you forgive men when they sin against you, your heavenly Father will also forgive you.

Matthew 6:14

Forgiveness just doesn’t come naturally. We’d rather keep score, tracking the offenses of others against us. Nursing a grudge can feel rather pleasant, at least for a while. Eventually, though, grudges have a way of growing until, monster like, the bitterness we’ve created devours us.

Our Savior teaches us a better way in today’s Bible verse. Almost always when Scripture urges us to forgive, it reminds us in the same breath that our Lord has forgiven us. By forgiving others, we demonstrate that we have understood our need for God’s forgiveness—and treasure it. God’s forgiveness toward us nurtures and encourages within us the decision to forgive those around us. 

As we grow in grace, we come to recognize more and more fully the value of the pardon we have received from Jesus. Then, more and more willingly we pray, “Lord, work your heart of kindness in me and teach me to forgive.” 

Prayer: Lord Jesus, your cross laid to rest all the grievances you had against me. Thank you! In light of your pardon, teach me . . . 





Meet the “What-Abouts”

We know that in all things God works for the good of those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose. 
Romans 8:28

The “what-abouts” of life fly in the face of Paul’s words in today’s text from Romans. “In all things,” the apostle writes, “God works for the good of those who love him.” We want to believe it. But often, when we hear the promise, we find questions forming in our minds. “Yes, but what about . . .,” we want to ask.

Some in our world have corrupted the promise from Romans 8. They have created a new expression. “Everything happens for a reason,” they say. No! No, it doesn’t. Senseless things happen all the time. 

But our Savior-God promises to take even the senseless pain of this world and, in mercy, weave it into the fabric of our lives for our good. He promises to do this for “those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose.” 

“We know,” Paul writes, inspired by the Holy Spirit himself! 

Prayer: Lord, thank you for the encouragement of this promise. Still, I need your help today with a “what-about” (or two) . . .

Meet the “What-Abouts”

We know that in all things God works for the good of those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose. 
Romans 8:28

The “what-abouts” of life fly in the face of Paul’s words in today’s text from Romans. “In all things,” the apostle writes, “God works for the good of those who love him.” We want to believe it. But often, when we hear the promise, we find questions forming in our minds. “Yes, but what about . . .,” we want to ask.

Some in our world have corrupted the promise from Romans 8. They have created a new expression. “Everything happens for a reason,” they say. No! No, it doesn’t. Senseless things happen all the time. 

But our Savior-God promises to take even the senseless pain of this world and, in mercy, weave it into the fabric of our lives for our good. He promises to do this for “those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose.” 

“We know,” Paul writes, inspired by the Holy Spirit himself! 

Prayer: Lord, thank you for the encouragement of this promise. Still, I need your help today with a “what-about” (or two) . . .

Meet the “What-Abouts”

We know that in all things God works for the good of those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose. 
Romans 8:28

The “what-abouts” of life fly in the face of Paul’s words in today’s text from Romans. “In all things,” the apostle writes, “God works for the good of those who love him.” We want to believe it. But often, when we hear the promise, we find questions forming in our minds. “Yes, but what about . . .,” we want to ask.

Some in our world have corrupted the promise from Romans 8. They have created a new expression. “Everything happens for a reason,” they say. No! No, it doesn’t. Senseless things happen all the time. 

But our Savior-God promises to take even the senseless pain of this world and, in mercy, weave it into the fabric of our lives for our good. He promises to do this for “those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose.” 

“We know,” Paul writes, inspired by the Holy Spirit himself! 

Prayer: Lord, thank you for the encouragement of this promise. Still, I need your help today with a “what-about” (or two) . . .




 

This devotion has been adapted from one that appeared in CTA’s devotion book for women entitled Reflecting the Beauty of the Lord. You are welcome to copy it for one-time use in your organization as long as you will receive no monetary benefit from it. Please include the copyright lines printed below.

 

Scripture is from the King James Version of the Bible.

 

Used with permission grant #010312. © 2012 CTA, Inc. No duplication of this article is allowed without the express written consent of CTA, PO Box 1205, Fenton, MO 63026-1205. www.CTAinc.com.